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timmylish
28-03-2014, 23:13
are already causing clients difficulties whilst on holiday in Spain, according to one of the main news stations in Moscow this evening. It is clear that Visa are not handling transactions originating thru' a particular bank and the client is left unable to make purchases etc on his card in the normal way. At this time its difficult to know which banks, and therefor which cards, will not be cleared. Not the supplier,s fault, nor the client,s just everyone suffers except Putin and his pals who are now setting up a different clearing system for use internally only, in Russia. No use to us here of course. A couple of news media here reported estimates of up to 30% drop in Russian business this summer. We estimate its likely to be a lot more with certain suppliers not prepared to handle Russian business, unless in cash!

YOUNG GOLFER
29-03-2014, 01:34
Well getting rid of Putin would be the best solution to all problems. The man comes across as a bully and a thug.
And it's every day people who are likely to suffer due to him being being mentally unstable.

LUCKY
29-03-2014, 12:44
I loved the ad at the side of your post.:flatcap:

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russiagirlsdating.com
Open the Way to Russia Girls. Blonds, Brunettes & Acres of Fun!

bonitatime
29-03-2014, 19:45
Not much fun if you are here on holiday and suddenly have no money

TenerifeTeddy
30-03-2014, 01:12
One of the parents who comes out regularly from Russia, and whose children attend Callao Learning Centre whilst here, was complaining on the exchange rate of Roubles to Euros which has been adversely affected by the situation in the Crimea, and possible wider consequences.

IMO Putin wants to recreate the Soviet Union with him in charge as dictator. The West to date, has been ineffective in stopping his ambitions. I think more than sanctions will be required to rein him in.

9PLUS
30-03-2014, 01:22
Not much fun if you are here on holiday and suddenly have no money


Russian girls can always get money

timmylish
30-03-2014, 01:59
Well getting rid of Putin would be the best solution to all problems. The man comes across as a bully and a thug.
And it's every day people who are likely to suffer due to him being being mentally unstable.

Nearly every modern day Russian will disagree as regards Putin. When he was put up for election he promised to restore pride to the Russian Nation and he certainly achieved that very quickly. However much the west may disagree all that he has done in Crimea is to restore it as a part of Russia, given away as a gift 60 yrs ago much to the amazement of the Russian population at the time. As to his mental prowess never, ever underestimate the man, like the Americans have done. Personally, although I don,t like the man I do understand a lot of things he has done for Russia (albeit to the detrement of others!).

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One of the parents who comes out regularly from Russia, and whose children attend Callao Learning Centre whilst here, was complaining on the exchange rate of Roubles to Euros which has been adversely affected by the situation in the Crimea, and possible wider consequences.

IMO Putin wants to recreate the Soviet Union with him in charge as dictator. The West to date, has been ineffective in stopping his ambitions. I think more than sanctions will be required to rein him in.

Aye, there is no doubt a lot of other Westerners may think like you on the Soviet Union ambitions of Putin. I disagree. He wants Russia to be all powerful and not be considered as the poor partner at the G8 for example (if it still exists). The turnaround which has been achieved in the industrial central areas of Russia, for example, could not be done in a Soviet style country. Whilst seeking real power for himself he does understand that "middle society" needs to see the benefit of increased wealth so watch this space for more Russians of a sort of normal background society having much greater wealth than comparable societies in the West. By looking after them he is less likely to be overthrown at any time soon. Like most other societies the Russians like being loaded, big houses, cars etc etc. Don,t confuse these people with the criminal element.
I would be interested to know what more, other than the current sanctions, will bring Putin into line?

delderek
30-03-2014, 09:59
He reminds me a bit of our Maggie Thatcher.:whistle:

kingbaker
30-03-2014, 10:23
He reminds me a bit of our Maggie Thatcher.:whistle:

Ah come on he's not THAT bad!:(:p

junglejim
30-03-2014, 10:41
Timmy whilst Kruschev's "giving away" of Crimea may have been naive , the treaty signed in1994 when Ukraine gave up Nuclear Weapons has been broken by Putin
http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2014-03-05/ukraine-gave-up-nuclear-arms-in-1994-deal-russia-flouts.html

I believe Putin is concerned about his strategic Naval base in Sebastopol and subsequent access to Meditteranean just as much as we are concerned about holding onto Gibraltar and its strategic control of entrance7 exit to the Mediterranean!
What would we do if Spain unilaterally took over the "Rock" ?
Further economic sanctions may result in Putin closing off fuel supplies to most of Ukraine and half of Europe and so it escalates - the fact that some "ordinary" Russians are being affected on their jollies will be of little consequence to Putin and his cohorts .
He is behaving like Macho Man and his stance on Gays and other issues re-inforce this ,it will be interesting to watch how much more de-stabilisation occurs both in Ukraine and Russia in coming months .
I would be surprised if Merkel or Hollande give up their economic ties or even the UK with its London Financial involvement -" Money Talks " as Neil Diamond says !
Also ,just look at the economic damage the USA has done to Cuba !

TenerifeTeddy
30-03-2014, 11:53
Crimea was always the "low hanging fruit", it already had large numbers of Russian forces in place, and it was easy to provoke a pretext to take it back.
I notice that Putin say he has "no intention" of invading other parts of the Ukraine, but again large numbers or Russian forces are in place all along the Southern and Western borders, and another pretext that will "force" him to take actions to protect ethnic Russians living in Ukraine is easy to provoke.

He has the "stick" of witholding gas supplies to large parts of Europe if the West makes the sanctions too onerous. Personally I never understood why any nation would willingly make itself dependent for its fuel supplies on such an unstable country. He has already shown his willingness to turn off the taps. He can pretty much do as he likes knowing the West will be highly reluctant to take any measure that would threaten those supplies.

I think he pretty much has a clear run to take back most of the former Warsaw Pact countries, Europe wont take military action, unless he attacks a NATO country, and I wonder even then, as most Western politicians are gutless these days.

The West has hurried to disarm itself over the last 20 years, and make itself defenceless against any quick moves. It took 6 months to build up enough forces to invade Iraq. How long would it take to rebuild enough standing armies and armoured divisions to deter Putin further - far too long.

I served for 23 years in the RAF and most of that time the Soviet Union was in place, and we had large, mostly well equipped forces, across NATO to defend against the threat posed.
I am horrified at how far we have reduced those forces, not just the UK, but the whole of NATO. If anyone wonders what message that sends to the like of Russia, then you now have your answer.

golf birdie
30-03-2014, 12:18
He has the "stick" of witholding gas supplies to large parts of Europe if the West makes the sanctions too onerous. Personally I never understood why any nation would willingly make itself dependent for its fuel supplies on such an unstable country. He has already shown his willingness to turn off the taps. He can pretty much do as he likes knowing the West will be highly reluctant to take any measure that would threaten those supplies.

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That would harm Russia more than Europe.

Taken from the Guardian;

Gazprom has no wish to see sales to Europe disrupted. At its annual meeting with investors in London on Monday, company officials were optimistic about its prospects despite a 13% fall in its share price triggered by recent events in Ukraine. Indeed, they predicted Russia's share of Europe's total gas supply would actually increase in future as overall consumption and Britain and Norway's gas production declines.

Europe accounts for around a third of Gazprom's total gas sales, and around half of Russia's total budget revenue comes from oil and gas. Moscow needs that source of revenue, and whatever Vladimir Putin's geo-political ambitions, most energy analysts seem to agree he will think twice about jeopardising it. Short of an actual war, the consensus appears to be, Europe's gas supplies are unlikely to be seriously threatened.

TenerifeTeddy
30-03-2014, 14:04
He is an old style Soviet dictator in all but name. He has surrounded himself with his own followers and the Duma rubber stamp any decisions he makes. Any sanctions that damage the Russian economy will only affect the ordinary Russian people, not the people in power.

Since he first came to power he has quietly rebuilt the Russian military, which was in dissarray after the breakup of the Soviet Block. His stated intention is to return Russia to greatness, and part of that is regaining territories lost. He now has the wealth of the oil and gas deposits found in recent years to fund his ambitions. I am sure he will accept short term economic losses if it means he can achieve his ams, especially if all he faces is weak economic sanctions and no real military threat.

essexeddie
01-04-2014, 19:48
That would harm Russia more than Europe.

Taken from the Guardian;

Gazprom has no wish to see sales to Europe disrupted. At its annual meeting with investors in London on Monday, company officials were optimistic about its prospects despite a 13% fall in its share price triggered by recent events in Ukraine. Indeed, they predicted Russia's share of Europe's total gas supply would actually increase in future as overall consumption – and Britain and Norway's gas production – declines.

Europe accounts for around a third of Gazprom's total gas sales, and around half of Russia's total budget revenue comes from oil and gas. Moscow needs that source of revenue, and whatever Vladimir Putin's geo-political ambitions, most energy analysts seem to agree he will think twice about jeopardising it. Short of an actual war, the consensus appears to be, Europe's gas supplies are unlikely to be seriously threatened.


I'm sorry but I wouldn't believe anything written in the left wing Guardian, they have their head in the sand.