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View Full Version : Why are the British referred to a 'Guirris' in Tenerife?



KirstyJay
29-01-2015, 14:17
I was told the reason a couple of days ago by a student, but I just wondered if anyone else knew first...

Give your theories or answers below. Where does the word 'Guirri' to refer to an English-speaking tourist or resident come from?

I found it very interesting!

Malteser Monkey
29-01-2015, 14:28
I was told the reason a couple of days ago by a student, but I just wondered if anyone else knew first...

Give your theories or answers below. Where does the word 'Guirri' to refer to an English-speaking tourist or resident come from?

I found it very interesting!

Guiri or Guirri ?

not in my Spanish dictionary and Google says Guiri

Also says Brit tourists are referred to Langostas - for their red faces in the sun:D

kingbaker
29-01-2015, 14:33
Guiri or Guirri ?

not in my Spanish dictionary and Google says Guiri

Also says Brit tourists are referred to Langostas - for their red faces in the sun:D

And their hankies tied at the four corners!! Wonkey Forum wont take smilies

doncarlos
29-01-2015, 15:48
Guiri - It’s a generic name that is given to any foreign visitors to Spain. Not just to the British.
It’s was a shortened form of the name guiristino which is an old Basque name for their (old) enemies.

KirstyJay
30-01-2015, 01:18
Guiri - Its a generic name that is given to any foreign visitors to Spain. Not just to the British.
Its was a shortened form of the name guiristino which is an old Basque name for their (old) enemies.

That's not the explanation I have....

Ecky Thump
30-01-2015, 01:39
I found this and I presume Given the flip lops and white socks it's referring to British tourists or incomers who have bought property .:D

http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Guiri#/image/File:Eat_the_Guiri.JPG

Andy0210
30-01-2015, 01:43
I was told that we was known as Giddys, and in the North we are known in the South as Giddy Land, was told that it wasnt a very affectionate term and it was the equivalent of us being called Pakis in the UK?

Not sure if thats correct just my experience of the phrase you are asking, website below this kind of goes a little to explain this.

http://sabriyeinspain.blogspot.com.es/2011/02/did-you-see-that-giddy.html

seanocelt
30-01-2015, 03:18
What did you hear Kirsty? I only know that when i mentioned drink prices in Los Cris to a local in my village they said " ah, Impeusto de Guirri". Foreigners/tourist tax?

bonitatime
30-01-2015, 08:50
My impression is it has passed over the years from being an insult to just bring a description
I have had it described as the sort of tourist who is blonde burned and drunk. It is used only for Northern Europeans
Looking online there are various explanations but the one I like best comes from the Malaga area where they couldn't say Girl and it got translated into Guiri

Jabba43
30-01-2015, 09:04
"Guirri" I have heard this used in Iceland when a Geordie is asking the staff for directions to the frozen curries and nann bread.

universal
30-01-2015, 13:02
It says this in Wiki ................... so it must be true!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Guiri (pronounced: [ˈɡiɾi]) is a colloquial Spanish name used in Spain applied to foreigners. The term guiri is a popular name for gorse (Ulex europaeus), a spiny bush with yellow flowers.

Source[edit]
According to the Real Academia Dictionary, this word can be traced back to 19th century Carlist Wars in the form "guiristino," the pronunciation of Basque-speaking Carlist forces of the name of their enemies, the Cristinos (after regent Queen Maria Cristina).

"Guiri" is used by the inhabitants of Reus for visitors from near the city of Tarragona. It is also widely used as a depreciative term by inhabitants of the Balearic islands, Mallorca, Ibiza and Menorca, as well as the Costa del Sol, for pale visitors usually from European countries. A brief web search of the term "los guiris" is sufficient to see its widespread use, although a depreciative term in some areas, in many Spanish sites and even local TV and Radio.[original research?]

Finally, there is a theory that it derives from Moroccan Arabic gaouri, which in turn stems from Ottoman Turkish gvur.[citation needed

marbro8
30-01-2015, 19:50
What did you hear Kirsty? I only know that when i mentioned drink prices in Los Cris to a local in my village they said " ah, Impeusto de Guirri". Foreigners/tourist tax?you mean we are being ripped off at 1 a pint:lol:

warbey
30-01-2015, 21:10
you mean we are being ripped off at €1 a pint:lol:



Zumo de Guiri would be a good Brand Name..........................